News

Can I share my holiday meal with my pet?

“Can I share my holiday meal with my pet?”

Our pets are part of the family and it’s only natural to want to include them with their own special dish.

If your dog or cat hasn’t had food sensitivities in the past, they can enjoy a taste of your holiday meal, but with a few precautions.

NONE of these:

  • Make sure the food isn’t too spicy or fatty.
  • Avoid ingredients such as raisins and grapes (can cause kidney failure in dogs), xylitol (artificial sweetener), onions, scallions, leeks or other members of the onion family (which can cause serious health problems).
  • No chocolate, caffeine, or alcohol.
  • No Macadamia nuts, which have a toxic ingredient to dogs (Who knew?)
  • No bones, which can splinter and cause serious intestinal damage.

YES, please! Here’s a sample plate that you dog or cat can enjoy safely. Just keep the portions small.

  • Turkey or ham, fully cooked (without bones or glaze)
  • Mashed Potatoes (if no garlic or added ingredients that irritate). Skip this one for cats because of butter and milk ingredients.
  • Green Beans
  • Macaroni and Cheese (just a taste—it’s high in fat)—dogs only. Cats don’t tolerate milk well.
  • Cranberry sauce—again, just a taste, because it’s high in sugar. Even better, your dog may prefer some raw cranberries as a treat.
  • Sweet potatoes with no brown sugar/cinnamon topping.

Your cat will be easy to please. She’ll be more than happy with a tasty slice of turkey or ham, no sides.

Happy holidays!

And remember to include on your gift list your favorite animal welfare organizations this holiday season.

To donate to PetFBI, click here: http://petfbi.org/how-to-help/donation-form/
To volunteer, click here: http://petfbi.org/how-to-help/anyone-can-help/
_____
Sources:
http://www.thehonestkitchen.com/articles/holiday-meals-pets-can-eat-too/
http://www.petmd.com/dog/wellness/nutrition/evr_multi_holiday_scraps2
http://www.banfield.com/pet-healthcare/additional-resources/article-library/safety-tips/holiday-foods-that-are-hazardous-to-pets?BanfieldBuildReleaseTag=20171116h
http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/general-pet-care/thanksgiving-safety-tips

The Top 5 Safety Risks for Your Pet at Halloween

Can’t wait for Halloween? Your pet may not share your excitement.

And it’s not just the indignity of those ridiculous costumes. Here is a list of the top 5 Halloween safety risks for dogs and cats.

  1. Halloween treats with chocolate or xylitol (a common sweetener) can poison your pet
  2. When trick-or-treaters flood your porch, your dog or cat may panic and escape out the door.
  3. Electrical décor and wires and can invite chewing and turn deadly. Pets can also get tangled up in the cords causing injury.
  4. Wrappers, strings, and foil in your pet’s tummy can cause illness or blockages.
  5. More than any other time of year, cats (and dogs) are targets of pranks and abuse.

Keep your pet inside and away from the ghosts and goblins. Even the most kid-friendly pets can be overwhelmed and scared, leading them to growl, snap, or bolt.

Make sure your pet has proper identification. Microchips are recommended along with ID tags.

Not all pets tolerate a costume. If you still want your pet to sport a seasonal costume, make sure it doesn’t interfere with his vision, movement, or going to the bathroom. Try it on him a time or two before the big day, and if he struggles and shows distressed behavior, consider just a festive bandana.

Article contributed by Pet FBI volunteer, Linda Blaine.

The Big Give 2017 – Columbus Foundation

Support Pet FBI by Participating in The Big Give

WHAT IS THE BIG GIVE?

The Big Give is a 26-hour online giving event to make a difference through kindness. The Columbus Foundation, its family of donors, and corporate and community partners have provided a $1.3 Million+ Bonus Pool, encouraging everyone to support nonprofits they care about.

Donations received during the 26-hour event will be amplified by Bonus Pool funds on a pro rata basis. Everyone who gives will have their donation(s) increased. In addition, the Foundation will cover all credit card fees, so 100 percent of donations go to participating nonprofits.

HOW DO I PARTICIPATE?

Make a donation to support Pet FBI beginning on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. ET, through Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 12:00 p.m. ET. To begin, go to our listing at columbusfoundation.org.

Donations may be made by using a major credit card (VISA, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express), starting with a minimum gift of $20.

Everyone who makes a donation will receive an email receipt of their donation.

Thank you for supporting Pet FBI!

 

Party on the Patio a Doggone Good Time!

Party on the PatioThank you to everyone who came out to support Pet FBI at Wednesday’s Party on the Patio. The weather was perfect and all the dogs, and their people, had a great time!

Special thanks to the Overtime Sports Pub and Zuko’s Pizza for hosting. The pizza was fantastic and the happy hour drink specials were amazing. The Overtime even brought out martini glasses filled with dog treats!

Dwayne Napper kept the party hopping all night with his music. Thanks Dwayne!

Many thanks to The Boutique Truck and Gleicher Treats for coming and supporting our cause as well as the representatives from Adornable.U, Rodan + Fields, Scentsy, and SignatureHomestyles.

We had such a great time, we’ve started planning our next one!

 

 

Party on the Patio for Pet FBI!

Wednesday, August 9 from 6:30-9 p.m.
Overtime Sports Pub and Zuko’s Pizza
4337 Cosgray Road, Hilliard, Ohio 43026

Join us on the patio at the Overtime Sports Pub to eat, shop, and enjoy some beverages – all for a good cause!

Zuko’s Pizza will be serving up the best pizza around while the Overtime Sports Pub will be offering happy hour specials on their dog-friendly patio.

The Boutique Truck, Columbus’ first mobile fashion truck, will be selling their amazing clothes and accessories. Gleicher Treats will have their wholesome, yummy dog treats for sale, and representatives from Adornable.U Accessories, Signature HomeStyles, Scentsy, and Rodan + Fields skin care will be selling their products as well.

Live music will be provided by Dwayne Napper. Plus, we will be raffling off some great pet-themed items!

All of these lovely businesses will be donating a portion of their proceeds to Pet FBI. Thank you! Donations underwrite the cost of services so our information center for lost and found dogs, cats, and all other pets is provided for FREE!

Can Your Pet Make You Sick?

Thanks to Amber Kingsley, who researched and wrote this article. We hope people will take heed. We have heard too many stories of people who won’t take their children to visit Grandma because her kitty has runny eyes or a runny nose, or worse yet, people who put their dogs or cats down because they seem to have a chronic “cold” although the pet is otherwise healthy, eating well and enjoying life.

We humans often suffer from the common cold or a flu virus. When we get sick, we tend to steer clear of other people so as not to transmit the infection and “spread disease”. Because these illnesses spread quickly among ourselves, we may assume that our pets are also capable of  transmitting their colds and upper respiratory infections to us.

cat w mask

In our great-grandparents’ time, it was rabies that was a huge concern when it came to animals spreading diseases. It was especially problematic with wildlife like rodents, skunks, raccoons and other nuisance animals that could come into contact with us or our pets. Thanks to aggressive rabies immunization requirements for pets, it is very rare indeed for a cat or dog to infect a person with rabies. But what about our pets’ “colds” and “flu”?

The Truth About Cats & Dogs – Colds & The Flu

In a nutshell, if a companion animal has a virus that causes a cough, symptoms of a cold or the flu, the organisms that cause these symptoms are different for pets from what  they are for humans. The bottom line is, “colds” and “flu” aren’t spread from animals to humans, or vice versa. If you’re sniffling and your four-legged friend is sneezing, this is only a coincidence and not a shared condition.

Although it’s possible that you both may need to be seen by a doctor or veterinarian,  the two aren’t linked within a shared virus. Beware, although humans usually have the ability to fight off a cold or the flu on their own, if a dog or cat is showing cold or flu-like symptoms, you should take them to see a vet immediately as these could be a sign of a different, more dangerous disease.

Kennel Cough & Upper Respiratory Infections

Kennel cough got it’s name from how easily this disease is spread from animal-to-animal in close quarters, like conditions found in shelters or kennels. Although highly contagious, especially with canines, kennel cough or Canine Bordetellosis, is not transmittable to humans (note the word canine in the identification of this disease).

sick dog

http://www.pawsomeposts.com/do-dogs-get-colds/

Cats seem to be more susceptible to upper respiratory tract infections compared to canines and this condition is also highly contagious among felines. Just as humans carry bronchitis and viral pneumonia and can pass it from person-to-person, again, these are different types of diseases that aren’t interchangeable between humans and pets.

What You Can Catch

Not to say that you aren’t in some kind of danger from catching something from one of your pets, but as you’ll see, chances and odds are slim, comparable to contracting rabies:

Lyme disease: It is “humanly” possible (but highly unlikely) for an infected tick present on a pet to detach, transfer onto a person and thereby give them the disease from a bite. Thanks to the vigilance of most pet owners who ensure their animals aren’t bothered by fleas and ticks, they’re using medications help to keep these types of nuisances at bay.

Salmonella: Reptile owners (snakes, turtles, lizards, etc.) run a much higher risk of contracting salmonella from these cold-blooded creatures since it’s commonly found in their feces. The majority of these pet owners are aware of this fact and take special care in cleaning their cages or confinement areas.

Toxoplasmosis: This is actually a condition found mostly in the feces of cats and kittens. Almost a third of humans exposed to the virus are immune to the disease, but it can be problematic for pregnant women and their unborn fetus. That is why it’s recommended that women do not clean the litter box while they are expecting.

Remember that you are far more likely to contract something contagious from a friend, family member, coworker or another human that you’re in constant contact with, rather than from a pet. Don’t let the fear of contagion stop you from being a loving pet owner or visiting “Grandma” and her rheumy-eyed cat!

BEWARE! E-cigs Highly Toxic To Pets

Thanks to Chloe Bloom for contributing this guest blog about a very common and deadly hazard for today’s pets:

Electronic cigarettes are a fairly new but major danger for pets. Designed to mimic the feeling of smoking without burning tobacco, e-cigs health benefits vs. risks are debatable. The answer depends on which public health organization you ask. However something that is not being debated is the toxicity of nicotine. When ingested in high enough quantities it can have serious consequences.

skull and crossbones

e-cig cartridgesNone of the ingredients (apart from nicotine) in e liquid are toxic to ingest. They are food grade chemicals and flavorings that are used in things like toothpaste and candy making. This makes e liquid smell and taste very sweet. Because of this sweet taste the e liquid becomes very attractive to animals, who will relish the opportunity to eat such a sweet yet toxic liquid. They have no idea poisonous nicotine is also present. Ingesting even a small portion of a bottle of e liquid has a very high chance of killing an innocent animal.

A tragic recent news story emerged regarding a Staffordshire bull terrier named Ivy from the UK. Ivy managed to get hold of a bottle of e liquid that was left on a dining room table and she started chewing on it, only ingesting a tiny amount.

She then immediately started vomiting and foaming at the mouth. Ivys owner took her to the vets who gave her a large dose of steroids to try and save her. However Ivy unfortunately passed away from nicotine poisoning the next day.

With the amount of people quitting smoking using e-cigs rising every year, the tragic story of Ivy is unfortunately unlikely to be the last we hear of this issue. But there are simple actions any responsible e-cig using pet owner can take to ensure this tragedy does not happen to them and their animal.

Here  is some further advice from the ASPCA which maintains an Animal Poison Control hotline:

It’s crucial that vapers keep their stash out of the reach of pets. That means you should throw away your old cartridges as soon as you’re finished with them. Even if you think they are empty, they could still contain trace amounts of nicotine that would be dangerous if your pet ingested it. … The liquid nicotine is deadly for animals.

The first signs of nicotine poisoning in a pet generally begin within 30 minutes to an hour. Usually, the first symptom is vomiting. Pets might also develop diarrhea, drool uncontrollably, act agitated or have a fast heart rate. If your pet consumes a higher dosage, you will see seizures or extreme lethargy. In some cases, the accident can turn fatal quickly.

Liquid nicotine poses a particular threat because it is quickly absorbed through mucous membranes in the pet’s mouth. If your dog eats a cigarette, the liver has a chance to absorb most of the toxicity. However, liquid nicotine gets absorbed before it ever reaches the stomach causing a more immediate risk and a real emergency.

If your pet accidentally ingests a cartridge or gets into your eliquid, call the vet right away or contact the ASPCA Animal Poison Control hotline at 1-888-426-4435.

How To Earn Money for Charity By Shopping!

igive header

Do you shop online? Doesn’t everybody?
Here’s an easy way to support Pet FBI and help us get more pets back home.

All you need to do is sign up for igive.com before August 31 and shop within 45 days of joining. If you are a new member, Pet FBI will receive $10 or you can chose to share half with any other registered non-profit you choose to support once you make your first purchase.

When you install the igive button on your browser, your purchases will automatically earn a bonus for Pet FBI

When you install the iGive button on your browser, your purchases will automatically earn a bonus for Pet FBI

Just about every major online retailer participates in the iGive program, almost 2000 of them. Each time you make a purchase the retailer donates a percentage to Pet FBI. If you are like the average member you would earn about $50 per year for your charity – all without any expense to you. Please forward this invitation to your friends.

There’s no limit on the number of friends and colleagues you can invite, but there are two vital details:

1. New iGive members only (never joined before) and they must shop within 45 days of joining.
2. They must use your special link for Pets Found By Internet (PET FBI) to get credit

Here’s the link – thanks for helping Pet FBI and lost pets:

http://www.iGive.com/welcome/warmwelcome.cfm?c=10236&m=129567

 

Pet FBI Featured on WOSU / NPR “Tech Tuesday”

Ann FisherThis morning our founder and Executive Director, Maresa Fanelli, was interviewed by Ann Fisher on Central Ohio’s National Public Radio affiliate, WOSU. “All Sides With Ann Fisher” examines topical issues and events in lively and informative interviews with an entertaining style.  Listeners participate via telephone, e-mail, Facebook and Twitter to add to the conversations. As always at WOSU, the coverage is fair and balanced with a civil tone.

Each Tuesday, the second hour of Ann’s broadcast is devoted to technology in today’s world. In her “Tech Tuesday” interview, Fanelli discussed the impact of the Google Ad Grant that Pet FBI was awarded.

Since its inception in 1998, Pet FBI has always depended on word of mouth to attract visitors. Fanelli explained the concept of pay-per-click and how the Google Ad Grant enables Pet FBI to come up at the top of online search results.  As more people post lost and found pet reports to one single central database, the better the chances of a successful reunion.

For people who have lost pets to connect online with those who have found them, there must be a “critical mass”.  Pet FBI  has been active in Ohio since 1998, and is well known. About 40% of Ohioans who submit a lost or found pet report eventually update the status to “reunited”. But it has only been two years since Pet FBI went national and scaled up the database, so the success rate nationally is less than 20%. But it is growing every day, and the Google ads are the major factor in that.

Fanelli also explained how petfbi.org works and how it is unique among the many lost and found pet web sites. For one thing users can do a well-defined, targeted search by timeframe and area. Moreover, Pet FBI keeps records for up to five years, unless the user inactivates it, which is a simple procedure. Perhaps most importantly, since Pet FBI is strictly non-commercial and non-profit, we can link to other sources of information online.

The problem with looking for a lost or found pet report online is that information is scattered everywhere. While Facebook and Craigslist are popular venues for posting lost pet reports, it is not possible to do a targeted search on those sites. Most other lost pet sites are for profit and charge a fee. Still, all-volunteer, not for profit Pet FBI has the largest, best designed and easiest to use of all the public lost pet databases online. Now with the Google Ad Grant we are closer to achieving our goal of getting more lost pets back home by consolidating the most information in a single central database.

Here’s a link to a podcast of our 15 minute opening segment on “All Sides With Ann Fisher – Tech Tuesday:

Compassionate Pet FBI Facebook Friends Rally to Help Pathetic Pooch

dog with huge mass
This poor fella, found in an alleyway in South Columbus with a large mass on his side, needs to visit the vet. His Good Sam is not in a position to absorb this unforeseen financial burden. 

Dog and good Sam

16 year old Good Sam. with Baby after a nice bath. Doesn’t he look grateful?

She posted on Pet FBI Ohio’s Facebook page and our kindly, caring Admin, Char, called for donations. Within 12 hours over $300 was donated by twenty good souls. When the first vet bill came in at $435, an anonymous donor swooped in and paid the balance. Another $210 came in after hours, That will go towards his ongoing care.

Dog at vet

Baby at vet

Baby is younger than he looks, does not have heart worms, and his blood panel came out OK. But they need to keep him a few days so they can do more tests and control his diet. It is dangerous to let  an animal or  a person gorge after a long period of not  eating. He will also need surgery most likely. You can follow our Facebook page for further bulletins. You may need to scroll down to Baby’s picture.

Fortunately, there is someone in the Good Sam’s family who can give Baby a good home, but his vet bills are not over yet. If you can, please make a donation to help Baby.

Donation link